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elections. as well as a growing pressure from congress as will some u.s. allies in the region against diplomacy. focus shifted to sanctions and tehran responded by further expanding its nuclear program leaving both sides worse off today than they were a few years ago. in the meantime, sanctions have held iranian middle class for the impoverished population while the regime's repression and human rights abuses have continued to intensify and its nuclear program has continued to expand. but a new window for opportunity for diplomacy has opened through obama's convincing real election, and in the next few months, up until the iranian new year, both sides enjoy maximum political space and maneuverability to negotiate effectively. the logic of diplomacy is obvious. it's the only option that can truly resolve the issue. sanctions can cripple iran's economy at the expense of destiny that pro-democracy movement there, but sanctions alone cannot resolve this issue. the military option can set back the program for a year or two but only at the expense of ensuring that eventually iran eventually
is hurting u.s. foreign policy objectives. and asian policy is a good place to rebuild i partisanship to the discussion is just under two hours. >> thank you all for being here this afternoon, and welcome to georgetown university. we've come together today for a special conversation, a conversation between top diplomats, past and present, each of whom has played a significant role in u.s. asia relations over the past two decades. with representatives from the administrations of george h. w. bush through the current administration of barack obama, our guest speakers today offer their expertise and experience as a look back on the use of service and look forward to the future of u.s.-asia relations. wish to offer my gratitude to georgetown's asian studies program, our school of foreign service, and the korea economic institute who have partnered to bring together some of our countries most respected minds on foreign policy and asia. we are deeply grateful to doctor victor cha a professor in government and asian studies and director of asian studies here in georgetown. carol lancaster, o
, senator lieberman has pointed to the iranians as retaliating against the u.s. banks for the stuxnet attack that i will talk about momentarily. and our power grid. what is the risk? well, one is that terrorists want to break into our power grid. those of you that have lived a few days without power, as mark and i did in d.c. when a few trees knocked down our power lines, well, there are already, according to a number of the experts, foreign nation states that are in our networks, in the power system. the operation aurora, a few years ago, proved that a cyber attack can bring down the power grid with a cyber attack on one of the systems causing it to literally shake itself to death. and if you've noticed, you can't go to wal-mart and pull these power systems off the shelves. it takes a few months to get them back. a few months without the systems could be a $700 billion impact. the intelligence community in the u.s., they are afraid, too. they warned that already they should -- nation states are in our power grid. as you've already heard from john harrington, for the first time that i recall
talk about u.s. links to the drug war and the thing that is so impossible? you have to read it in some specific story and also find a back door, some different way into it. that is always an important piece of the puzzle. >> to look at another aspect of this, and citizens, witnessing with their cameras all over the world, i found myself thinking of those, everyone from folks in syria, in homes, trying to show what they could to focus here in oakland with camera phones, trying to show police misbehaving. someone who wrestled with the question of fact of journalism, how to protect people, whether they are citizens or professional. don't really have a big conversation about that. should there be an international standard of journalistic rights were if you are committing journalism you should be protected? out you protect those folks? >> good luck implementing that law. it is a great question, something journalists struggle with all time with a rise of social media and sites you have started out as a compendium of information, shootings in streets, be heading. started off like a visual wal
to the u.s. it's possible you could see the end of the arab spring at that conference held at columbus university in 2008. there's a matter of the public diplomacy people coming into the state department are often shunted off into consular work for eight years or whatever, for a long time before the ever get to any public diplomacy were. it's as though you're in the military and call your officers and send them off to, i don't know, do social work and then suddenly brought them back and said now you're in charge of the squadron. well anyway, but -- >> well, thank you, ambassador. and by the way, as far as the arab spring is concerned, i know that i was personally accused by some right wing bloggers having omitted the arab spring but i wish it were true, because of this event. although the event enabled me to do. the thing that was most fun of all of all the things that it did when i was undersecretary, which was that i got to call on the egyptian ambassador. i don't know if you really does, and made them come to my office and dressing gown which is sort of a great thing you can do trad
can while protecting our relationship with the u.s. with president obama, we are embarking on an unprecedented exercise an effort at further integration and selling of the border. this is important for both countries. i not agreebama and i on everything. these countries a share so many in common -- an economy and larger value system. we share security needs and we share security threats. when you have a relationship that close, it cannot help but be good. it has been good. i look for to four more years of working with president obama. >> you just returned from asia. you seem dead like them in a little jet lag. >> president obama is in asia. his first trip when he was elected was here in ottawa. his first trip for his reelection was asia. you both you asia as important both of you are committed to enhancing free trade. you are looking at 50 trade deals. i wanted to ask you -- when our organization was founded 25 years ago, we were founded to be a proponent of free trade. there are not enough voices on either side of the border that point out the benefits. that is why we star
in this age moving forward there are some elements of cooperation with labor migration. u.s. imports 2 million immigrants this is a trend that will increase. of course, some 10 trees it matters more. >> i would agree there is no appetite for a plush former integration our bilateral engagement. of the same could be said for china are other countries in asia. there are rumors floating around they try to have the unprecedented meeting of all heads the state's in his similar in the caribbean with a strong component that china can cooperate with every 10 but not economic engagement in particular. >> [laughter] that is the next summit of the america is. >> i am proud and honored to introduce two individuals. he is a former staff sergeant of the united states army. he is the first living person to receive the armed forces medal of honor for actions that occurred after the and vietnam war perry dead -- be it now war. the major general was awarded the united states highest military decoration for heroic actions in 1968 during the vietnam war. he served on active duty in the marine corps over 33 years b
of other medicare reforms which involve not reducing the price of medical services in the u.s. which are overpriced by oecd standards. not improving delivery system efficiency by just rationing out years. if you have a separate freestanding national conversation, no deadline, no sense of urgency, what to do but the future of medicare and medicaid, and one group just said we want massive permanent rationing of access to health care, again, that's not going to go anywhere. so if you favor cutting entitlements like social security and medicare and medicaid, by methods like this, it makes perfect sense for you want to bury this in the fine print of legislation on another subject like a bird in the fiscal cliff. it's just like putting a rider on a defense department bill for something that has nothing whatsoever to do with the defense department. that is, i think the fruits and united states which were ideological reasons, and cases of the financial industry, want to cut social insurance in force people to buy more private for-profit sector products like annuities or private health insura
you drive young people here. you have been involved in a major study, u.s. competitive project at harvard business school. engage thousands of people, thousands of voices, discussions with hundreds of economic leaders and come up with a eight point plan of things you are advocating. i have gone through and some of that makes a lot of sense to me. it would have made sense in the 1990s and the 1980s. what makes you think this is such a big deal now? >> i want to say we have had a chance to interact with the jobs council in the harvard business school effort and tremendous alignment. tremendous alignment, the striking thing we found is we all agree on almost everything that needs to be done except we can't do any of it. this is now an opportunity we have -- >> let me interrupt. you said the immigration of highly skilled individuals is one and it sounds like sean hannity is on your side. is that a more doable -- >> i hope so. what i would like to do is to say that the fiscal cliff issue we have been talking about all they hear -- all week, is really important and we have to make pr
of office of u.s. citizenship appointed by president bush. he was responsible for developing and promoting initiatives and programs to educate immigrants about the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. and encourage their integration into american civic culture. brad bailey is the co-founder and ceo of texas immigration solution. from 2000 to 2011, brad was vice president of operations for three bailey family-owned houston-area restaurants. brad co-founded texas immigration solutions in 2012. the group seeks to develop and advance conservative solutions to u.s. immigration policy. brad also served on the 2012 platform committee of the republican party of texas. richard land is president of the ethics and religious liberty commission, that's the southern baptist convention's official entity assigned to address social, moral and call concerns with particular attention to their impact on american families and their faith. richard is also executive editor of ffv, a national magazine dedicated to coverage of traditional religious values, christian ethics and cultural trends. and last but
at the beginning of the 20 first century? how do you define the role of the u.s. what to play and how we are playing the role now? >> let me set up from a negative. i have seen -- involved in four wars that we started with great enthusiasm and almost total support and did not know how to end which turned into a debate about the speed of withdrawal with no other outcome. i was involved directly in the vietnam war. most damning of charge in public debate was victory as if it is a simple effort when you engage in war so let's start from the premise that we must develop a policy wherewith we engage ourselves we prevail and i would therefore taylor this to genius that means also a vision of our military strategy based upon physical -- staffing a crane or circumstances off by overwhelming it where the enemy could control the pace of operations risking cohesion and capabilities. how you apply that into a situation i don't know precisely but i do think we need a strategic concept of that nature. secondly -- when you take -- you must have some national interest in an academic context or dinner pa
addressing these challenges require the participation of the army corps of engineers, noaa, u.s. geological service, fema and so many other agencies. and i think the chairman has raised the right issue. this should be a turning point in our efforts to deal with these issues on a comprehensive basis, not on a particularized basis. there are smaller measures, however, that could be taken as well. in particular we should not ignore the army corps' continuing authorities program, the cap program, as part of the response. this includes section 205, flood control and section 206, environmental restoration. for states and commitments with limited resources, these smaller scale projects can be enormously beneficial and effective, particularly after disasters. i appreciate the steps taken in the authorization of the water resources development act to utilize cap authorities. i also want to acknowledge the committee's efforts to increase the cost limitations for some cap authorities. these are positive measures that we should work to expand upon. before i conclude, i want to note the role that previo
in this world than the u.s. military, to understand and think through all the secondary and tertiary, primary elements of a plan and how to execute it. so, leveraging that skill set and engaging with the appropriate authorities on how to respond to a health emergency, and how you would address these issues well before the incident occurs is probably the best solution. now, those teams probably exist to do that. but whether or not, it really depends on their maturity of that country and its ability to leverage very scarce resources. just like in the u.s., our health care professionals barely have enough time to address the day-to-day health care needs of the population, let alone planning for emergency. this is the challenge, but i think this is where the military and the u.s., in collaboration with its other federal partners, can be extraordinarily successful. >> in the back. i think we're probably just about running out of time, so the mic is behind you. core question. >> i'd like to refer back -- university of wisconsin republic referred back to ambassador hume's reference to the shipping i
with the jurisdiction and the understanding you have now, could you stop another necc u.s. manufacturing drugs? could you stop and a? >> sadly, necc was not the person it will not be the last and don't work together to clarify and strengthen the laws that surround -- >> dr. smith, you indicated in your opening statement that because of what happened, people have been fired and suspended, is that true? >> direct speak you've also implement new registrations and oversight interpretation cejka prevent this and happen again, is that correct? >> yes. >> okay. dr. hamburg, have you fired or suspended anybody at the fda because of this tragedy? >> no. >> okay. have you gone through introspectively, look at the agency and said these are the regulations, these are things we need to do to prevent another necc, have you done this because we have done. we been working very hard to identify one of the authorities that we need to be able to protect the american people, and to help to ensure that they get the quality drugs they deserve. with a necc incident is your position today that this could've been prevented b
majority of the people, and you had u.n. backing so there was no way it could be tarred as a u.s.-alone, imperialistic attack to try to scoop up natural resources for yourself and cause blowback, then, yes -- >> i have seen this movie before, and hearing this talk about, oh, yeah, we're not going to bring in the exiles, and we're going to pick legitimate people in the country, and tom friedman backs it up. please. i saw it the first time. you guys were all in school the first time, but even there you probably got the idea that it didn't work out so hot. let's just let things happen the way they're going to -- let other people worry about their own countries. we have enough problems in this country. >> jim, did you have -- [applause] >> yeah. no, that's fairly similar to my own view. >> okay. i do have one question i could ask bill. if it was 2005 and it was george w. bush who wanted to do the libyan intervention, would you have supported it then? >> with the u.n. >> okay. let's do something related to military and foreign policy, and that is, of course, military spending. many on
part of the historic results of this last week where he had 20 women in the u.s. senate, and historic number and rebecca rightly reminded us that it was in part because of things like emily's list that i want to have a conversation about the kind of institutions and the organizations that have been working quiet they all this time to make this moment possible. i don't have to say something about emily's list. >> families list within washington politics, it is an incredibly powerful force. at some point they were the largest organization. i don't know if that's still true, in the day of the super pacs, they are not the largest anybody. so emily's list is an organization that supports democratic pro-choice women for all kinds of offices around the country. they are very powerful and have been working really hard for a long time to get more women effect did. other celebration about the creator of the woman, sometimes you want to say this is terrific progress in other times you say wow, 20%. but it's very, very hard work getting women elected. so i cited emily's list because they're the b
president but he signed things u.s. grand. i don't know if there is a memory of my own childhood that grew me to grant but in the neighborhood i grew up in, in portland, ore. there was a public park and the sign on the public park was u.s. grant park. for the longest time i thought this was the federally owned park granted to the city for some reason or other. that is part of the answer. the other answer is i had a hard time convincing the people who designed the dust jacket to get all the words on there that are already on their. the man who -- "the man who saved the union," ulysses grant, the man who saved the union war and peace is a lot of words and especially with a photograph. i didn't want to push things. one last thing. ulysses grant sort of rolls off the tongue. add an s, ulysses s. grant, it really wasn't an oversight. it was by design. >> a more substantive question about the title. it is called "the man who saved the union". i get that, he was the general who turned the tide of the civil war, saving the union but what i didn't know until i read the book, the work of saving the
on earth are we ever going to do so? so we see this is very as very important for the reelected u.s. administration and yes, he is right about the icc. that is what we are saying. we are not saying that anyone should he exempt from the icc for the long-term future. the negotiation has to succeed and everybody has to accept some things that are temporary or that are unpleasant. we have our own experience of that. many honorable members with the violent peace process. we had to do things that we were very reluctant to do but necessary to bring about a settlement. that is true in the middle east as well. schmidt are alumni along with joe biden. [applause] along with joe biden who has just been elected for a second term as vice president of the united states. [applause] together, they are the reason the university of delaware has been called the epicenter of politics. and since then another alumnist governor chris christie of new jersey has demonstrated his brand of politics based on reality whether than wishful thinking. he embraced president obama after hurricane sandy to the dismay o
view across the nation was to get them alongside the afghans. and i saw the u.s. officers were shocked that there was an absolute desire for those on the day to get back in. if they stepped back and away, and doug touched on this in proximity to the afghans and the intimacy to the afghans, very often the best form of defending against this form of attack. >> general, will you be able to achieve a successful combat troop by the end of 2014? >> i certainly hope so. [laughter] let me give you a statement. >> i thought you did get a statement. >> this will be the root biggest redeployment operation in a generation. there is a lot of equipment and material. we need to understand how much we have to move over this. matter of time. >> the physical withdrawal, -- the overall general impact of the withdrawal. will we be able to be successful? >> yes, we will. of course from the national operation is synchronized inside a wider operation. great work is being done to deliver that coordination. >> i wonder if i could ask if we are seriously to believe on january 1, 2015, but the afghan national se
. named one of the most 100 powerful arab women last year, appears on u.s. cable news channels quite often and the founder and chairman of the independent think tank beirut institute. safeen, a member of the kurdistan democratic party. he's also a member of the -- was a standing-in member of the iraqi governing council of the authority in 2004. he was exiled to the u.k. and returned to his homeland and is playing a very key role in its development in the kurdistan province. let's make it a conversation, more oprah, fewer speeches, and hopefully everybody gets involved shortly. i want to begin by asking all the panelists to take a bird's eye view first. how you see the flow happening in the region generally, in syria in particular, and where do you see some connections happening. afra, would you like to begin? >> hello, everyone. good morning. i'm replacing my colleague from the syria national council. i was slightly surprised he chose me because he knows i'm in the non-violent movement in syria, and i'm doing my ph.d. on the non-violent movement in syria, and so it's quite a privilege to b
. and this, this isn't a referendum on u.s.a. football on warner. the leading on this in terms of reforms. and i think that's fabulous but the reality is the big lack of control over can you force youth football programs to do the things we know is a good idea. the answer we just said is no. we can't. with the unknown and issues, we have to take a serious look. >> yeah i want to bring in michael. he's a lawyer, you can talk about the liability questions here as we develop knowledge. first i'm going go to gill. a school board member locally. also father, was a father of the football player. tell us about the implications on schools as we learn more about this problem. >> okay. thank you, tom. my name is gill. i'm a school board member here in the northern virginia area. also --there's several things components to it. first is education. the parents that are out there are still don't know about this issue by and large. and it goes all the way down to the youth sports league. my kids have played multiple sports. they played them all. we have been a big sports family with our boys. but with f
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